Himalayan Dog Chew product review

March 28, 2013 | Comments Off

Himalayan Dog Chew sent us over two of their products for Spenser to try out. In the Himalayas, the chew, an authentic type of cheese, comes from an ancient recipe that is used by the locals to create a long-lasting snack that they can slowly work in their mouths while they are working in the fields. Dogs discovered it and love it as well. It is a very hard chew. Although cheese, it is sometimes popularly referred to as Concrete, Glass, Wood, and Metal. Depending on the size of your dog and its eating habits, this is potentially a very long-lasting dog chew. They must work the end of the treat for hours, softening it with their mouths, before small parts of it can be slowly scraped off. When you give this chew to your dog, you know that you are providing them with hours of high-quality eating entertainment. It is made from 100% Yak and Cow Milk, is 100% Natural, contains No Additives, Preservatives, or Binding Agents, and is Gluten Free. It has a four-year expiration date that starts the day the package is opened, as long as it remains in dry conditions.

Here are photos of what was sent to Spenser from Himalayan Dog Chew:

Himalayan Dog Chew product review
Himalayan Dog Chew product review

And here’s what the bone looks like right out of the package:

Himalayan Dog Chew product review
Himalayan Dog Chew product review

Here’s a video where I take a closer look at these items:

Included in the package:
- 1 Himalayan Dog Chew, size large
- 1 Himalayan Dog Chew seasoning powder

Here is some information, straight from its website, about how the Himalayan Dog Chew is made:

We have created a consortium of roughly 900 farmers in the Himalayas of Nepal. These farmers are trained, given 5-6 months of notice, and are paid right away to produce the Himalayan Dog Chews.

Here is how the chews are made, using the ancient recipe and techniques that are still prevalent in the Himalayas:

Each farmer has 2-5 cows and yaks that they milk everyday, using traditional methods, without any modern devices. The cattle are fed all natural leaves from the forest and graze on natural pastures where present. They collect roughly 6 gallons to make 2 pounds of Himalayan Dog Chew. On average, each farmer makes about 20 pounds per month.

The milk is boiled for 4-5 hours. The hot milk is poured into a hand-cranked centrifuge device, some using more traditional methods, to remove all the fat. The fat is boiled to make local butter called “Ghee” and is sold as a separate commodity. The fat-free milk obtained is used to make the Himalayan Dog Chew.

Once the milk has cooled down, it is treated with 10 ml of lime juice and 10 mg of salt for about 100 gallons of milk. The sour of the mild acid coagulates the milk, and the salt speeds up the process. The solids are then separated using a burlap sac, which is washed several times using warm water to remove the whey and any hints of salt and lime juice.

The solids in the burlap sac are then subjected to squeezing for about 3 weeks, when the cake obtained contains at most 5% moisture. They use bricks as weights and shapers with sacs of moist chew in the middle.

The cake is then cut to size and prepared for cooking under the sun and smoke for 2-3 months. They are strung through ropes and hung for drying/cooking.

These chews are collected from the farmers, brought into our warehouse, and then sorted for quality. The best 10-15% are retained for Himalayan Dog Chew, and the remaining 85-90% are sold in local market (in Nepal) for human consumption and other purposes.

The chews are further cleaned using buffing machines and lime juice, cut to size, packaged, and then shipped to dealers from our facility in Washington State.

Here are photos & videos of Spenser checking out his new dog bone from Himalayan Dog Chew:

Himalayan Dog Chew product review
Himalayan Dog Chew product review
Himalayan Dog Chew product review
Himalayan Dog Chew product review
Himalayan Dog Chew product review
Himalayan Dog Chew product review
Himalayan Dog Chew product review
Himalayan Dog Chew product review
Himalayan Dog Chew product review
Himalayan Dog Chew product review

And here are photos & a video of Spenser trying out the Himalayan Dog Chew seasoning powder:

Himalayan Dog Chew product review
Himalayan Dog Chew product review
Himalayan Dog Chew product review

The verdict? Spenser was very interested in the Himalayan Dog Chew at first, but he’s just not that much of a chewer in general. He will lick it and bite at it, so I know he likes the flavor. I was hoping he’d soften it up enough to want to keep going, but he gives up on it rather quickly each time he approaches it. This is totally my fault for asking to review an item that’s described as “a very hard chew” when I know he’s not much of a bone guy; it has nothing to do with the product itself not being a good item. In fact, he likes the seasoning powder just fine, and it’s made from the same stuff. Now if our beloved Becca Girl were still alive, Mark and I both have no doubt that she would have inhaled it within minutes. Though she had very few teeth due to a lack of care before we adopted her, she was such a big bone chewer. Also, I’m considering trying out some of their Yaky Yam products because Spenser just loves yams. If you purchase any of their products, please let me know what you think!

Edited to add: The company suggested that we heat up the bone in the microwave for something like thirty seconds so that it would soften as well as release yummy cheesy aromas. It did both of those things, and afterwards Spenser ate almost the whole bone in one sitting!

(Full disclosure – Himalayan Dog Chew provided these items to us free of charge in exchange for a product review. Thanks!)



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